Background

Smoking is a known risk factor for colon cancer. Assessing the validity of publicly available data for confirming this. We are layering this on previous data published in our previous article.

Methods

Utilizing the CDC Wonder database along with Census data for state population from 2015 we were able to generate a rate of colon cancer by gender for all 50 states (as well as the district of Columbia).  We then utilized the Chronic Disease and Health Promotion data from the CDC for smoking utilization by state. We then ran a Pearson Correlation calculation over the current smoking (by gender) vs colon and rectal cancer incidence rate and then calculated a P value from the score.

Results

Table 1 shows the rates (per 100,000) by state.

The Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R) for the males was 0.707 and is considered a moderate positive correlation. The P value from this correlation was  < .00001 and considered significant. Figure 1 shows the scatter plot for smoking rate vs colon and rectal cancer rate for males.

The Pearson Correlation Coefficient (R) for the females was 0.5712 and is considered a tendency for positive correlation. The P value from this correlation was .000012 and considered significant. Figure 2 shows the scatter plot for smoking rate vs colon and rectal cancer rate for males.

Conclusion

Smoking appears to have a significant tendency to moderate association (based on gender) for current smokers to have higher rates for colon and rectal cancer. Further looks into current vs former vs never smokers will be investigated.